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How to Grow and Care for a Black Rose Aeonium

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Aeonium arboreum 'Zwartkopf', commonly known as Black Rose or Black Rose Aeonium, is a perennial succulent with large burgundy leaves that resemble flowers.

Growing Conditions

Black Rose requires full sun to develop the dark color, but it will tolerate partial shade. It is a drought-tolerant plant and prefers well-drained soil with a slightly acidic pH of about seven. It blooms yellow flowers in the winter and provides a colorful display in the garden, container, or a sunny window. Black Rose thrives in USDA plant hardiness zones 9 through 11, and container plants can be kept outdoors year-round.

General Care

Water Black Rose deeply until the water drains through the bottom of the container, about once a week in spring and fall. Allow the soil to dry until it is slightly moist at the root level between waterings. Reduce watering in summer and winter. Black Rose planted in the ground requires less watering than container plants, so feel the soil a few inches down near the roots to check for moisture. If it feels completely dry, water deeply.

Fertilize with water-soluble 10-10-10 fertilizer diluted to half-strength once a month in spring and fall.

Spray Black Rose with insecticidal soap or neem oil thoroughly at the first sign of aphids or pests. Repeat this weekly until the pests are gone.

Repotting

Repot Black Rose every two or three years in an unglazed terracotta pot that is slightly larger than the diameter of the plant. Loosen the plant carefully from its pot by grasping the base of the stem, and shake off excess media from the roots. Trim off any damaged or rotting roots with scissors or pruning shears completely.

Fill a pot with fresh potting mix, leaving room for the roots. Set the plant in the pot, and lightly pack the potting mix around the base of the stem. Water the plant and place it in a sunny location.

Propagation

Growing Black Rose from cutting is the fasted method. It also allows gardeners to make duplicates of plants that are already in the garden, as the Black Rose clipping has the same characteristics as the parent plant.

Source: sfgate.com

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