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Aloe dorotheae – Sunset Aloe

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Scientific Name

Aloe dorotheae A.Berger

Common Names

Sunset Aloe

Synonyms

Aloe harmsii

Scientific Classification

Family: Xanthorrhoeaceae
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Genus: Aloe

Description

Aloe dorotheae is a nicely colored low-growing succulent plant that suckers to form clumps of rosettes up to 20 inches (50 cm) wide on short stems up to 10 inches (25 cm) that lie flat to the ground. The stiff shiny leaves are colored greenish yellow to bright orange red often with some white spotting when young and stiff spines along the margins. In mid to late winter a 1 to 2 foot (30 to 60 cm) flower spike (usually unbranched) rises above the foliage with dark flower buds that have green at the tips and open to show greenish-yellow petals.

Aloe dorotheae - Sunset Aloe

Photo via flickr.com

How to Grow and Care

Aloe is a very forgiving plant, and a well-grown Aloe can be quite beautiful. As with all succulents, it’s essential that Aloe is never allowed to sit in stagnant water, and the plant should be carefully monitored to watch for signs of overwatering. Water generously in the summer and nearly cease watering in the winter. Do not let water stand in the rosettes. Prefers warmer temperatures of 70ºF/21ºC to 80ºF/27ºC, but will survive down to 40ºF/4.5ºC.

Aloe are not particularly fast-growing and will only rarely need repotting. Repot plants in the spring that are tipping over their pots or have ceased growing. Use a fast-draining potting mix with one-third sand or pebbles. During repotting of a larger plant, it is possible to carefully divide the root ball. Some kinds of aloe will send off off-sets that can be potted independently… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Aloe.

Origin

Native to Tanzania.

Links

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